December 4, 2009

This SC Johnson heiress is a pop singer

The sixth generation -- the great-great-great-granddaughter of Samuel Curtis Johnson, founder of SC Johnson -- is a pop singer?

Five generations of Johnsons have built what started back in 1886 as Johnson's Prepared Paste Wax Company into the worldwide home products behemoth we know today as SC Johnson, a family company (with sales of about $8 billion a year).

The family, in fact, still runs it: the fifth generation, Sam Johnson's kids -- Fisk, Curtis, Helen and Winnie -- are firmly in charge of the various corporate entities and foundation.

But what about the sixth generation? Will they find inspiration in Raid, Pledge, Glade and all the other products that have enthroned five members of the family in the top half of the Forbes 400 list, with a combined net worth approaching $10 billion?

In a word, no. At least not Samantha Marq, daughter of Winnie Johnson Marquart, younger sister of H. Fisk Johnson III, chairman and CEO of SCJ.

We learned today through the 'net that Samantha, "an heiress to the SC Johnson fortune," has just released her first single, Super Girl, "a unique blend of hip hop infused pop and dance on her first album The Evolution of Love in Dysfunction."

Samantha has a website where the tune will be available for downloading free, starting in January. For now, however, you can surf over there and listen to it. (Just click on the Music link.) The website says Samantha will release each track from the album separately, over a period of time, "as diary entries" and is "treating each new single as an album release unto itself, complete with full videos." You have to sign up and become a member for access to the new tracks and videos, but it's free. The song is also on Samantha's MySpace page, but only for this weekend it says.

Notes the website, "Already a regular staple on the Hollywood Red Carpet scene, this heiress is all grown up and ready to take the music world by storm."

“This album is so personal to me. I want everyone to know how hard I worked on this project and be able to listen to the music and take something special away from it.... My whole life people knew my name, but hopefully this album will show people who I am.”

Her online bio says Samantha grew up in Virginia Beach, VA, and graduated from California's Pepperdine University; her father is Michael Marquart, who owned Windmark Recording, a studio where she watched Justin Timberlake record Justified (which we don't pretend to have heard).

63 comments:

  1. That is very weird.

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  2. PrefersCoffee12/05/2009 12:56 AM

    I agree with the first comment!

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  3. Hey, let's give Samantha a chance and some credit for being original. At least Samantha didn't graduate from her clan's traditinal alma mater, Cornell.

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  4. Go Pepperdine!

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  5. Dear 4:22 A.M., You didn't spell "traditional" correctly. Even so, I agree that Samantha should have an opportunity to show the music world what she can do. Furthermore, it's refreshing to see a trust fund recipient eager to create something worthwhile instead of merely cutting checks to underlings and calling herself a patroness of the performing arts.

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  6. Allow Ms. Marq to make her mark.(Despite the socio-economic advantages her kinship connection brings Samantha, she must be sick and tired of being written off as an idle heiress who's had all the goodies handed to her.)

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  7. She is very beautiful in that last picture, and not due to the long blond locks IMO tho the hair adds a nice touch.
    Good luck to her.

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  8. The Johnson family must be so proud.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J6C7se8Vx-U&feature=related

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  9. You just have to love You Tube. Her "formal" date, Sean Landis

    http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=smlandi2#p/u/0/iSDgzIeYaUI

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  10. I like her. REd hair be nice but I do like her

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  11. Here is a song about someone stealing her boyfriend, but that's ok, they will never be like her because they don't have her designer shoes. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=griFOC9uQeA

    Sorry for multiple posts, but I find the story entertaining. Note: It's not the "music" I find entertaining, and I predict not many others will either. Just a hunch.

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  12. PPPPPPPPPPPPPPPTTTT!!!!!!!!!

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  13. You can call me Ray....12/05/2009 8:56 AM

    I find it refreshing to read a story about someone who has incredible wealth and has parents that own a recording studio breaking into the business!

    It is good to finally read a story about someone overcoming the odds!

    Kudos to the Post!

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  14. "The Evolution of Love in Dysfunction"
    Not life. Your negative slat to things related to the Johnson family is always so sad. leave this kid alone to do what she want with her life.

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  16. If Sam didn't roll over in his grave about the sale of Johnson Diversey, this is sure to do it!

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  17. The first word of the song that Ruth linked to says it all: Samantha Marquart feat. KO THE LEGEND- Call Me.

    She's just a poor little "home girl" with a personal recording studio and money, money, money. I'm sure a lot of young girls want to grow up to be a "bitch" or a "ho" in a hip hop video.

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  18. Dear 10:53 AM, Sam's probably chuckling at her antsy antics. From what I've heard, the little guy with the big bucks had a great sense of humor.

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  19. I just played Samantha's "Super Girl" for my canaries. Believe it or not, though they normally prefer classical music, they loved her song.

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  20. Don't laugh--my cats liked it too!

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  21. Since critters (who usually don't have money) like Samantha's music, I'm glad that it's free.

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  22. Seriously, compared with a lot of the music out there, Samantha's "Super Girl" is good. And, yes, my cockatiels enjoyed it immensely.

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  23. "Super Girl" scared the raccoons out of my garage. As soon as Samantha started her song, my uninvited guests headed for the great outdoors.

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  24. The music seems ok, but why do they have to talk about getting on top of her in the bedroom?
    What race, sex, and age group is this song meant for??
    I would think even the aunts and uncles would be a little embarassed, no matter how much money the have, or don't have.

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  25. Are you flippin clueless???! The music seems ok? This is refurbished store bought fake music.....WEAK!

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  26. Whatever that music may be, it entertained my sun conures.

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  27. Ditto my ferret. The little fellow actually danced in time to the tune.

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  28. It's a shame that critters can't be music critics. So far, the only animals who didn't appreciate Samantha's "Super Girl" have been a pair of raccoons.

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  29. If the raccoons return this weekend, I'll play "Super Girl" for them again. Joking aside, it's not that bad a number.

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  30. Great story - this just proves money can't buy talent! LOL!

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  31. My hamster must be a Sam-ster: while I played Samantha's "Super Girl," he chortled and tried to sing along with her!

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  32. Your emphasis on personal responsibility is both naive and all-too-typical of the American conservative mentality. Believe it or not, the rest of the developed post-industrial First World doesn't share your hard-hearted, moralistic views. To most educated people in advanced countries, the power of the ordinary individual is miniscule and expecting that person to achieve impossible goals is seen as a form of cruelty. Your elitist Emersonian notion that disadvantaged people must overcome challenges within a system that was designed to exploit and crush them is ludicrous. In Western and Central European social democracies, Australia, New Zealand and Canada, a more realistic attitude toward self-reliance prevails: enlightened progressive countries provide free to low-cost health care for all citizens and pay special attention to the needs of their less-fortunate people. As a result, the compassionate countries have far lower infant mortality rates than our sad (and, in some ways, Sadistic) land.

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  33. Okay, but what has that got to do with Samantha's music? Teasing aside, though it seems to get very mixed reviews from humans, birds and beasts (other than raccoons) love it. Maybe Samantha ought to perform at next year's Animal Crackers concerts...

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  34. One thing's certain--my gerbil likes "Super Girl." I've played it twice for him and on each occasion he'd emit chirps of contentment while he danced.

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  35. She should have Red hair.

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  36. Ideally, Samantha should have had to rise or fall on her own merit or lack thereof. However, we have a far-from-equitable system which allows the privileged class to buy its way into the music industry. On the plus side, at least Samantha isn't greedy and offers her music to the public gratis. That's more than most members of her cash-laden clique would do.

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  37. In any event, a pal of mine swears that her Nubian dairy goat positively adores "Super Girl" and nods its head along with the beat. That happy hircine has rhythm and grooves on catchy tunes.

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  38. If most of our feathered and furry friends like Samantha's "Super Girl," we shouldn't pan it.

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  39. Even my dog--who hates most music and howls until I turn it off--has no problems with "Super Girl."

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  40. What we have here is an excessively-advantaged young lady with more dollars than sense and a society which lets her play games galore. Nevertheless, the fact that she doesn't charge for her music should stand in her favor. Given the insatiable greed of most of her plutocratic peers, Samantha's generosity is extraordinary.

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  41. But is it really generosity? Down through history, arty eliteniks have been notorious for their egotistical exhibitionism. For example, the Roman Emperor Nero would twang his lyre and warble for hours in public. King Louis XIV would perform in court ballets at festivals which were accessible to his commoners. In more recent times, President Truman's daughter Margaret sang for our citizens on the Ed Sullivan Show. Because these people possessed economic and/or political power, they were sure that they were endowed with talent which the rank-and-file were expected to hail as genius and acclaim accordingly.

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  42. Still--whatever people may think--the critters (except two Racine raccoons) like Samantha Marq and her music. Since gals of her class can get involved with far worse things than the entertainment industry, let's permit Samantha to enjoy some harmless fun.

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  43. Let's hope that Samantha will give a lucky break to some of the downright broke and less-advantaged performers. Then she'll be a real "Super Girl."

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  44. My tomcat sprayed my computer when I played her song.

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  45. "But is it really generosity? Down through history, arty eliteniks have been notorious for their egotistical exhibitionism".
    This explains your behavior on this blog. This girl uses her voice and you use a thesaurus. I'm not a fan of her music but from what I can tell, nobody is harmed.
    OLIGARCHY!

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  46. If she'll aid her less-privileged fellow musicians, nobody should object to Samantha and her songs. By the way, my blue and gold macaw bobbed his head and swayed from side to side while I played "Super Girl." Since such behaviour is an indication of avian bliss and entertaining macaws is a difficult task, I can't get mad at Samantha. (Compared with recordings intentionally made for the listening pleasure of parrots, "Super Girl" is great.)

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  47. Some people like "Super Girl" too. So far, out of eight neighbors, five enjoyed it, two could tolerate it and only one hated it.Considering that "Super Girl" is Samantha's first release, that's pretty good.

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  48. Dear 10:34 AM, Nobody I know has any quarrel with Samantha and her special sound. Any hostility I've encountered is inspired by our unjust socio-economic system and Samantha's privileged position within it. However, my friends and acquaintaces bear no animosity toward Samantha and wish her success in her endeavors.

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  49. Any teasing aside, Samantha possesses a precious gift--a pleasant voice which soothes most animals and birds. As any pet parent who's purchased music for his critters will tell you, that's something rare. (Most of the tapes, etc. made for pets rile rather than relax their intended audience.) During my seventy or so years on this planet, I've encountered only three persons (excluding Samantha) who had such a voice. One was a Kalderash Romany lady who could soothe and tame severely disturbed horses. Another was an African-American gentleman who had what he termed "a special way" with fierce dogs. The third was a very conventional WASP matron who discovered her gift by accident when she volunteered at a long-gone shelter for cats. The best of luck to Samantha!

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  50. Hey if people like the music, it will sell and she'll last. If they don't like it, she won't be around very long. It's as easy as that. The rest of your comments are meaningless.

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  51. Folks have a right to their opinions. Even so, let's hope that Samantha enjoys her career. The kid isn't harming anyone and her music pleases my budgies.

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  52. While we're at it, the comments about critters enjoying her music weren't (to the best of my ken) sarcastic remarks. As any reader of pet magazines will tell you, there are scads of CDs, videos and tapes out there which purportedly amuse birds and beasts. People blow big bucks on this merchandise only to have Fluffy yowl and Tweetie screech when they hear the cacophony. Good music for pets is a rarity and I, for one, am grateful to Samantha for providing it.

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  53. It is definitely pop music. The problem with these types of songs is they are not easily done live in concert. Too much manipulation with electronics.

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  54. True. Even so, my parakeets love "Super Girl"!

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  55. My birds also enjoy Samantha's second number--the one in which she sings about "going insane." The parakeets dance in time with the beat, spread their wings and bob their heads. (None of the above is a negative or sarcastic comment. As anyone who's worked with pet birds will tell you, the behavior I've described is a sign that our feathered friends are having a good time. Samantha's music is better than the stuff produced with avians in mind. If her pop music career doesn't work out, Samantha could take the bird music field by storm.)

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  56. My African gray parrot danced along to both of Samantha's songs. As for my cat (an orange tiger kitty), she purred contentedly. Seriously speaking, Samantha has a special voice which delights most animals and birds.

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  57. I think we have to hand it to her for graduating from a prestigious college and pursuing her passion. Just because she is trying for a career in music doesn't mean she isn't inspired by or want to be involved in what the company is doing. I am personally excited to see what she has to offer... Sam should be proud, Super Girl sounds great!!

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  58. Amen! And let's not forget that Samantha had the courage to attend a university which was and remains different from many of her relatives' alma mater. (For good or for ill, many Racine residents believe that a certain Upstate New York institution is a bought-and-paid-for playground for Samantha's kin.) Here's hoping that Samantha does well and enjoys her creative career!

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  59. Although I'd gladly trade my poverty for her wealth, it must be hell for Samantha to know that most people think that she's had all the goodies handed to her simply because she was born into the Wax-clan. Since she's an intelligent gal who'd like to do something on her own, being resented as a rich dilettante must irk Samantha early and often.

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  60. My diamond doves love Samantha's songs. Whenever I play her music, they coo.

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  61. By the way, despite their glmorous name, diamond doves are affordable pets. My little sweethearts ran me less than $8.00 each, sales tax included. Regardless of price, the diamond doves enjoy Samantha's songs.

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  62. So do my rosellas.

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  63. Ditto my Java temple birds!

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